Thursday, 21 November 2002 - 8:30 AM
Hilton San Francisco Continental Parlor 9 (100)

POLI-262. A Comprehensive Approach To Reducing Youth Access to Tobacco Products

Lea Susan Ojamaa, MPH, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program, lea.ojamaa@state.ma.us, Eileen M. Sullivan, MS, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program, eileen.m.sullivan@state.ma.us, Cheryl Sbarra, JD, Massachusetts Association of Health Boards, sbarra@mahb.org, D.J. Wilson, JD, Massachusetts Municipal Association, d.j._wilson@mma.org.

Learning Objectives: Explain how to develop effective compliance check procedures/protocols. List important components in training adults and youth to conduct compliance checks. Recognize how local media initiatives contribute to reducing youth access to tobacco.

Abstract: A primary objective of any tobacco control program is to prevent youth from starting to smoke. Massachusetts has learned many lessons from the 96,500 compliance checks that have been conducted in the state between 1994 - 2001. This presentation will give an overview of the comprehensive approach Massachusetts is utilizing to reduce youth access to tobacco. Since 1886, Massachusetts state law has forbidden the sale of tobacco products to minors. For over a century, enforcement of this state law was nearly nonexistent. In 1994 with the inception of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program (MTCP) this has changed. MTCP funds local programs to change community norms surrounding tobacco use. These programs are staffed at the community level. Most Boards of Health have promulgated local youth access measures, which mimic the state law, thereby allowing for local enforcement. This presentation will share compliance check procedures and lessons learned to make them more effective including enforcement after sales. Extensive training has been developed for both the adults and youth that are involved in conducting compliance checks. These will be shared with the group. MA has also used extensive merchant education and community based marketing initiatives to reduce youth access to tobacco. This presentation will highlight several of these projects including Retailer Resource Kit developed by MTCP and the MA Attorney General, a “got ID?” campaign that includes calendars, decals and advertisements as well as an in store campaign to address the issue of social sources of tobacco.
National Youth Access.ppt (99.0 kb)
compliance check memo.doc (23.0 kb)

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