Thursday, 21 November 2002 - 8:30 AM
Hotel Nikko Peninsula Room (80)

CESS-293. Filling the Gaps in Youth Cessation

Micah H. Milton, MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health (K50), mmilton@cdc.gov, Corinne G. Husten, MD MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health (K50), cch5@cdc.gov, Susan J. Curry, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Research and Policy Centers, suecurry@uic.edu, Sherry L. Emery, MBA PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Research and Policy Centers, slemery@uic.edu, Amy K. Sporer, MS, University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Research and Policy Centers, aksporer@uic.edu.

Learning Objectives: Describe the current state of youth tobacco cessation programs and the challenges that exist when identifying evidence-based interventions. Recognize the important aspects of youth cessation interventions to be considered for quality programming. List the channels through which available youth cessation programs can be identified, and explain the process used to uncover existing programs throughout the nation.

Abstract: There is a clear need for interventions that help young tobacco users quit, but we are just beginning to understand the complexity of the problem. The Youth Tobacco Cessation Collaborative (YTCC) has been working to ensure that every young tobacco user has access to appropriate and effective cessation interventions by the year 2010. We will discuss two major initiatives of this collaborative effort: the Youth Cessation Best Practices Initiative and the Helping Young Smokers Quit Initiative. Challenges faced by the audience, youth tobacco researchers, advocates and practitioners, will be addressed, providing an understanding of the issues and the efforts directed toward solutions.

The Youth Cessation Best Practices Initiative was the first of YTCC to provide recommendations and guidance to the field about effective interventions or “best practices.” Due to the limited evidence-base regarding youth cessation interventions, an expert panel of practitioners and researchers joined to make practical recommendations about appropriate selection, implementation, and evaluation of youth cessation interventions to promote standard practices. The result, Youth Tobacco Use Cessation: A Guide Making Decisions to Help Youth Quit, will be highlighted.

Aiming to fill the evidence-base gap, the Helping Young Smokers Quit initiative, in the first of two phases, is conducting a national survey of existing youth cessation programs to identify major program offerings, both promising and potentially harmful treatment practices, and the resources and constraints of the “real world” settings in which they are offered. The study methodology and a preliminary description of nationally available youth cessation programs will be presented.


HYSQ sanfran presentation1 handout.ppt (626.0 kb)
national conference teen cess talk 11-02final.ppt (435.0 kb)

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