Thursday, 21 November 2002 - 8:30 AM
Hilton San Francisco Continental Ballroom 6 (475)

D&D-259. Women, Girls, and Smoking: 21st Century Challenges and Opportunities

Rebecca L. Murphy, MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health (K50), rmurphy7@cdc.gov, Alyssa Easton, MPH PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health (K50), ace7@cdc.gov, Kimberly Weich Reuschť, BS, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, kwreusche@tobaccofreekids.org.

Learning Objectives: Describe current prevalence and trends of smoking among women and girls. Identify three ways the tobacco industry targets women. Explain five community interventions to reduce tobacco use among girls and women.

Abstract: Audience: Public health professionals, health educators, advocates, community organizers, organizations interested in womenís health.

Key Points:

A) Research

1. Major findings from the Surgeon Generalís Report will be discussed including smoking among African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Native, Hispanic/Latina, and lesbian and bisexual women.

B) Tobacco industry targeting of women

2. Ways in which tobacco companies target women and examples of such targeting will be presented and discussed.

C) Turning research into action

3. A demonstration of the new companion toolkit to the Surgeon Generalís Report will include a sample presentation, education and outreach activities, cessation tips, media advocacy, internal industry documents targeting women, and a video.

Educational Experience: Participants will learn about the latest research on women and smoking, how women are targeted by tobacco companies, and specific ways to pro-actively work to decrease smoking through prevention, cessation, and environmental issues. Participants will break into groups to develop a strategic plan to reduce tobacco use among women and girls in their respective communities based on area of interest (e.g. schools, colleges, health care providers, policy).

Benefits: The panelists are actively involved in health issues related to women and smoking and will share their unique experiences and backgrounds in epidemiology, health communication, and media advocacy with participants.


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